Aapo Nikkanen
‘‘‘Unsound (Aapos tape #2)’’’
Takes place at Albert Heijn, Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 226, Amsterdam
Every Sunday between 13 April and 12 May 2012 All day long, every 15 minutes


Unsound is a continuation of a former work, Aapos Tape, presented in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2011. If the first version explored the possibility to create a story through the element of sound, tape #2 leaves linearity behind and focuses on creating an environment, merely suggesting a narrative. It could be compared to a theatre set where lights propose a story and the actors remain unseen. The work aims to create an alternative, to take over the preconditioned space of a supermarket. The clash between expectancy and surprise will stimulate a competition within two parallel spaces.

What is it that will become unsound?

More about AAPO NIKKANEN

Aapo is 182 cm. He is in his final year studying a Master of Fine Arts at Sandberg Institute, majoring in Art. His interests include modelling, painting, designing, and speaking French. He also loves to travel and explore new horizons. Aapo’s motto is Strive for excellence through professionalism, hard work and determination.

Aapo Nikkanen (1982, Finland) lives and works in Amsterdam. In February 2012 we sent Aapo to a palm reader, who then wrote this biography.

“Aapo was only 3 or 4 years old when it happened. What exactly happened is still unclear, he always sustained they were aliens, but all we can say as a matter of fact is that this experience marked his life and mind. In his early years he indulged in various slightly excessive behaviours, but he never crossed the line as he was always too afraid of physical suffering. He has always been driven by pretty simple pleasures rather than will power, and art gave him pleasure so he started doing it effortlessly yet meticulously. Outgoing and open-minded Aapo enjoyed a rich and varied social and sentimental life until he met a person that proved to be very beneficial to him and this person became his ally. Years went by and all was well, Aapo's work started to gain recognition and his relationship was growing stronger and then he started to remember. Or he started to forget. Whatever was the case, his mind faded, he enclosed himself into his self-costumed imaginary and spend the rest of his long-lived and artistically proficient life in almost total isolation.”

Copyright Aapo Museum 2012